What's a word for not emotional?

What's a word for not emotional?

uninterested, callous, passive, stoic, laid-back, indifferent, blah, cold, cool, could care less, emotionless, flat, impassive, insensible, languid, moony, stolid, unconcerned, unemotional, unfeeling.

What is the opposite of emotional?

logical

What do you call an unemotional person?

1. unemotional person - someone who is seemingly indifferent to emotions. stoic. adult, grownup - a fully developed person from maturity onward. emotional person - a person subject to strong states of emotion.

What does non emotive mean?

"Non-emotional" means not showing emotion. For example, "He's a very unemotional (or 'non-emotional') man; he hardly ever laughs or cries. " Non-emotive" means not producing or inspiring emotion. For example, "It was a very non-emotive piece of music.

What are emotional words?

By emotional word, we refer to any word characterized by emotional connotations (e.g., “lonely,” “poverty,” “neglect,” “bless,” “reward,” “elegant”) or denoting a specific emotional reaction (e.g., “anger,” “happy,” “sadness“).

What does hyperbole mean?

Hyperbole (/haɪˈpɜːrbəli/, listen) (adjective form hyperbolic, listen) is the use of exaggeration as a rhetorical device or figure of speech. In rhetoric, it is also sometimes known as auxesis (literally 'growth').

Why is hyperbole bad?

The problem with hyperbole is that it calls attention, not to the substance of the argument you are making, but to the degree of force that you are choosing to put on it. Because hyperbole exceeds the burden (and could create a new burden).

Can a metaphor be a hyperbole?

Hyperbole always uses exaggeration, while metaphors sometimes do. This is a metaphor: “His words were music to my ears.” The speaker compares words to music. In contrast, a hyperbolic version of the same idea would be, “That's the greatest thing anyone has ever said.”

Is it a hyperbole or an hyperbole?

That's it - that's the entire rule. The only reason hyperbole is questionable at all is that "h" can be kind of tricky since in some words it's pronounced and in others it's silent. It's never silent in hyperbole, though, at least not as far as I've ever heard, so it is a hyperbole.

How do you identify a hyperbole?

Hyperbole is when you use language to exaggerate what you mean or emphasize a point. It's often used to make something sound much bigger and better than it actually is or to make something sound much more dramatic. Hyperbole is a figure of speech.

What is hyperbole and irony?

is that hyperbole is (uncountable) extreme exaggeration or overstatement; especially as a literary or rhetorical device while irony is a statement that, when taken in context, may actually mean something different from, or the opposite of, what is written literally; the use of words expressing something other than ...

Can epitome be pronounced differently?

Taken directly from Greek, where it means “abridgement,” “epitome” is now most often used to designate an extremely representative example of the general class: “Snow White is the epitome of a Disney cartoon feature.” Those who don't misspell this word often mispronounce it, misled by its spelling, as “EP-i-tohm,” but ...

What is the meaning of paradox?

1 : a tenet contrary to received opinion. 2a : a statement that is seemingly contradictory or opposed to common sense and yet is perhaps true. b : a self-contradictory statement that at first seems true.

Is oxymoronic a word?

Is oxymoronic a word? Yes. Oxymoronic is the adjectival form of oxymoron.

Is Bittersweet a oxymoron?

Oxymorons as Paradoxes There's nothing complicated about oxymorons, they're simply words or phrases that contain a contradiction in terms. For instance, “bittersweet” is an oxymoron, and it's also a paradox.

Is boo an onomatopoeia?

'Boo' is not an onomatopoeia. It is not a word that describes a sound.

What are words called that sound like what they mean?

The formation of a word from a sound associated with the thing it describes is known as onomatopoeia; the related adjective is onomatopoeic. ... Every onomatopoeia makes use of the sound inventory of the given language. This means that onomatopoeias for the same sound will differ in various languages.

What is it called when a word sounds like it's spelled?

Onomatopoeia (also onomatopeia in American English), is the process of creating a word that phonetically imitates, resembles, or suggests the sound that it describes.

What is it called when you say one thing but mean the opposite?

hypocrite

What is phonetic contact name?

The process of adding a phonetic name to a contact in Android is almost exactly the same as adding a nickname. Just open a card, tap the three-dot Menu button, tap Edit, scroll down and tap Add Field, then tap Phonetic name. Is Siri or Google Now having trouble recognizing names?

What does idiom mean?

1 : an expression in the usage of a language that is peculiar to itself either in having a meaning that cannot be derived from the conjoined meanings of its elements (such as up in the air for "undecided") or in its grammatically atypical use of words (such as give way)

Is no pain no gain an idiom?

Although this idiom is often associated with athletic coaches who urge athletes to train harder, it dates from the 1500s and was already in John Ray's proverb collection of 1670 as “Without pains, no gains.”

Is Break a leg an idiom?

"Break a leg" is a typical English idiom used in the context of theatre or other performing arts to wish a performer "good luck".

What are the 20 idioms?

Here are 20 English idioms that everyone should know:

  • Under the weather. What does it mean? ...
  • The ball is in your court. What does it mean? ...
  • Spill the beans. What does it mean? ...
  • Break a leg. What does it mean? ...
  • Pull someone's leg. What does it mean? ...
  • Sat on the fence. What does it mean? ...
  • Through thick and thin. ...
  • Once in a blue moon.

Do your best idioms?

do one's best. Also, do one's level best or one's damnedest . Perform as well as one can, do the utmost possible, as in I'm doing my best to balance this statement, or She did her level best to pass the course, or He did his damnedest to get done in time.

What are famous idioms?

Common English idioms & expressions
IdiomMeaningUsage
It's a piece of cakeIt's easyby itself
It's raining cats and dogsIt's raining hardby itself
Kill two birds with one stoneGet two things done with a single actionby itself
Let the cat out of the bagGive away a secretas part of a sentence

What are some old idioms?

20 English Idioms with Surprising Origins

  • Straight from the horse's mouth. Meaning: getting information directly from the most reliable source. ...
  • Let the cat out of the bag. Meaning: to mistakenly reveal a secret. ...
  • Butter someone up. ...
  • Pulling someone's leg. ...
  • Wolf in sheep's clothing. ...
  • Hands down. ...
  • Riding shotgun. ...
  • Barking up the wrong tree.