What are the other names for wife?

What are the other names for wife?

other words for wife

  • bride.
  • companion.
  • partner.
  • roommate.
  • spouse.
  • consort.
  • helpmate.
  • mate.

What can I say instead of husband and wife?

What is another word for husband and wife?
paircouple
partnersduo
itemlovebirds
loverstwosome
man and wifecohabitees

What's the slang for husband?

Hubby

What is cockney rhyming slang for wife?

Trouble and Strife is Cockney Rhyming Slang for Wife!

Why is a pony 25?

£25 is known as a pony in slang & it's believed to have originated during the Raj in India where some old Indian Rupee banknotes carried pictures of animals like pony £25 & monkey £500 on them. £50 is a bullseye. There is no £25 note only £20 & £50 etc. ... The 25 rupee note has a pony on it.

Why are balls called Jacobs?

Get Me Out of Here!, became well known for his frequent use of the term "Jacobs", for Jacob's Crackers, a rhyming slang term for knackers i.e. testicles.

What is sailors cake?

A sailor's cake is slang for anal sex. It is not rhyming slang though.

What's rhyming slang for brother?

Manhole Cover

What is slang for Jacob?

"Now, 'jacobs' is Cockney rhyming slang for 'knackers'. Jacob's Cream Crackers. It was my dad's favourite saying."

Why do Cockneys call a watch a kettle?

Kettle and hob = watch This is a confusing phrase as it doesn't rhyme with its modern day meaning. The term means watch, which has stemmed from a fob watch which was a pocket watch with attached to the body with a small chain. The kettle used to boil on the hob of a stove… hence the rhyme.

What is cockney rhyming slang for fish and chips?

Fish and Chips is Cockney slang for Hips. Credit: contributed by on 4-Sep-2009.

What is cockney slang for a watch?

Kettle and Hob

What is cockney rhyming slang for toilet?

Khazi is Cockney slang for Toilet.

What is a female toilet called?

A female urinal is a urinal designed for the female anatomy to allow for ease of use by women and girls. ... Unisex urinals are also marketed by various companies, and can be used by both sexes. Female and unisex urinals are much less common than male urinals (often assumed by the term urinal).

What is slang for toilet?

loo (British, informal) bog (slang) I'm reading it on the bog.

What's a fancy word for toilet?

What is another word for toilet?
bathroomlavatory
outhousethrone
pissoirrestroom
water closetgents
WCcloset

What is toilet called in USA?

restrooms

What is the English name for toilet?

bathroom

How many names are there for a toilet?

101 Names for a Toilet.

What do they call a bathroom in Australia?

If you need to go to the restroom, comfort room, or whatever else you call that room (because you're pissed, or simply pissed off), that place is the loo, or call it toilet.

Why do British call bathroom loo?

Loo. Despite being a very British word for toilet, 'loo' is actually derived from the French phrase 'guardez l'eau', which means 'watch out for the water'. ... Over time, it became loo and was applied to the toilet itself.

What is a bathroom called in Scotland?

For the uninitiated, cludgie is a Scottish word meaning “toilet”, although probably not to be used in the politest of companies.

What is Western toilet called?

European or Western Waters closet, also known as WC/EWC (Toilet designed to sit). Squatting pan (Toilet is designed to squat).

What is a men's toilet called?

A urinal (US: /ˈjʊərənəl/, UK: /jʊəˈraɪnəl/) is a sanitary plumbing fixture for urination only. Urinals are often provided in public toilets for male users in Western countries (less so in Muslim countries). They are usually used in a standing position.

What is a Carsey?

Noun. carsey (plural carseys) Alternative form of khazi: an outhouse; a lavatory. (Polari) A house.

What is a room with a toilet called?

The room where the toilet and sink are found is called a bathroom in a home. In a public place, the most common term is restroom, though bathroom, washroom, men's/women's room, and, occasionally, lavatory are also heard.

Why is a toilet called a karsi?

Dunny. Outside toilets are still very common in Australia, so dunny is a frequently used expression there. Its origins aren't clear but it's likely derived from an old English word danna, which means faeces.